Tag Archives: Mobile Marketing

2010: Resurgence for Digital Media in the Wake of the Recession


I mentioned previously this interesting research from Comscore, and I wanted to highlight more general trends about digital media coming out of it.
Comscore outlines that the digital media industry responded with significant growth across various media platforms to the wake of the recession. As they say: 

“Industry innovations brought an unprecedented number of options to consumers as digital media continued to weave itself even tighter into the fabric of Americans’ daily lives.” — comScore

Key findings about consumer trends, highlighted in the report, include:
  • Following 2 years of depressed consumer discretionary spending, the economy showed signs of improvement, leading to positive growth for the e-commerce market. Total U.S. e-commerce spending reached $227.6 billion in 2010, up 9 percent versus the previous year. Travel e-commerce spending grew 6 percent to $85.2 billion, while retail (non-travel) e-commerce spending jumped 10 percent to $142.5 billion for the year.
  • Social networking continued to gain momentum throughout 2010, with 9 out of every 10 U.S. Internet users now visiting a social networking site in a month, and the average Internet user spending more than 4 hours on these sites each month. Nearly 1 out of every 8 minutes online is spent on Facebook.
  • The U.S. core search market grew 12 percent overall in 2010, driven by a 4-percent increase in unique searchers and an 8-percent increase in the number of search queries per searcher.
  • U.S. Internet users received a total of 4.9 trillion display ads in 2010 with display ad impressions growing 23 percent in December 2010 versus December 2009. Social networking sites, which now account for more than one-third of all display ad impressions, were a significant driver of growth in the display ad market in 2010.
  • In December 2010, the average American spent more than 14 hours watching online video, a 12-percent increase from the prior year, and streamed a record 201 videos, an 8-percent increase.
  • Major milestones in mobile were crossed during the year as smartphones reached 1 in 4 mobile subscribers and 3G penetration crossed the 50 percent threshold. Approximately 47 percent of mobile subscribers are now connected Internet media users (via browsers, applications or downloaded content), up 8 percentage points from the previous year.

In short, businesses should consider these aspects of Digital Media in their strategies to be successful in the coming years:

  1. e-commerce
  2. Social Media Presence
  3. Search
  4. Advertising 
  5. Video on line as convergence with traditional TV continues to blur
  6. Mobile media for both consumption and as an alternative e-commerce platform

In 2010 people get the news online on par with newspapers: first time ever


According to eMarketer research, 2010 sees US consumers get the news, all demographics combined, online as much as on the radio or even more than through newspapers. This is a confirmed trend that I highlighted already some time ago, but it was at that time only for one demographic.

As a news delivery vehicle, the internet is second only to television, according to the Pew Research Center. More than 90% of Americans use one or more sources to get their daily news, and the number of digital channels is growing. Pew found that, on a typical day, 44% of US adults got news through a digital channel, either online or via mobile internet, email, social networks or podcasts.” — eMarketer

Should you rethink your PR activity? Yes you can!

Here is now some more details about the behavior of the US population sliced by demographics:

 To publishers, digital publications taking advantage of our proliferating mobile devices are to be taken into account to survive or thrive.

“While the number of digital newspaper readers will continue to grow as digital devices proliferate, the number of print newspaper readers will remain flat or continue to drop.” eMarketer senior analyst and author of the new report “The Digital News Audience: 24/7 Participation.”

And finally, let me share with you what role Twitter plays in this:

Enterprise 2.0 is going mobile fast



Celebrating more than 4 Billion mobile devices in the world cannot let us stay still in our views of the mobile Internet. It has dramatically changed the consumer behavior but is also making its way in the enterprise. It has many consequences for us marketers, application developers and executives in charge or impacting enterprise information system.

According to a very interesting Morgan Stanley research – The Mobile Internet Report – issued in December 2009, some early signs are attesting of a massive disruption ahead:

  • Material wealth creation / destruction should surpass earlier computing cycles. The mobile Internet cycle, the 5th cycle in 50 years, is just starting.
  • The mobile Internet is ramping faster than desktop Internet did, and we believe more users may connect to the Internet via mobile devices than desktop PCs within 5 years.
  • Five IP-based products / services are growing /converging and providing the underpinnings for dramatic growth in mobile Internet usage – 3G adoption + social networking + video + VoIP + impressive mobile devices

Enterprises in the U.S. are already taking advantage of this revolution to solve business problems and meet goals in reducing time and cost, improving customer experience or including consumers directly in business processes. Information Week states:

“General Motors is looking to a new iPhone application to change how and even where people sell cars. A national chain of rehabilitation facilities sees smartphones combining with cloud computing to improve patient care and employee productivity. A heart hospital is using BlackBerrys for nothing less than real-time alerts of patient distress, including images of bedside monitors. And around Los Angeles County, law enforcement officers are using BlackBerrys for such tasks as taking and searching fingerprints.” in a very interesting recent article.

In the complete research, you’ll find interesting figures about more than 500 businesses such as this one

Get Ready, include mobility in your plans.

Mobile Web 2.0 revenues to reach $22.4B in 2013




Fellow Marketers, I know I’ve been busy like crazy since a while but let’s believe that I’ll be back here with more regularity.
I’ve been tracking Internet users growth since Scott McNealy, in one of his colorful keynote, reminded all of us that the Internet was still growing fast. Most of us in the western world do believe that Internet is a given but it’s growing still fast – 5M new users per week – and growing mobile especially in Asia.

For us, marketers and software vendors, it must remain on our radar chart when we plan our campaigns and product roadmaps, especially when social networking is front stage. Why? Because more users on the net means more value for the network thus for the Internet, this is Bob Metcalfe law. It means more reach for any community every day.

If this is accurate, then Web 2.0 is going to bring a lot of revenue on the table, not only VC’s, and Mobile Web 2.0 should as well. Juniper Research issued in May 2008 an interesting white paper stating that “Mobile Web 2.0 revenues to reach $22.4bn by 2013 driven by User Generated Content and Social Networking.” Point taken and much appreciated.

Get ready for it. Web 2.0 burst year one i.e. 2007 was all about user generated content. Year 2 i.e. 2008 will be all about social networking and your multiple social networking identities management. More on this later, but you can double check Web 2.0 2008 conference keynotes that I did attend in San Francisco last April.

Where is Internet headed?


It’s been a long time since I published a post. Very busy working in my new company to revamp the product portfolio and its marketing. It’s a B2B software company and the question of course was: “what to have on our radar to think about the future releases of our applications”.

My nickname in this new company is Emmanuel 2.0, you wonder why? That’s because you’re a newcomer to this blog. So here we are, trying to figure out the major Internet trends. I’ve always been fond of supporting my hunches with data. So let’s deal with the claims first and the figures to follow.
Claim#1: The Internet is growing still very fast (5M new users per week) thus making e-commerce king
Claim#2: The Internet is growing mobile (2.8B mobile phones in 2007 growing to 3.8B in 2011 to be compared with 980M PCs in 2007 growing to 1.5B according to Gartner). “Worldwide sales of mobile phones to end-users surpassed 1,15bn units in 2007, a 16% increase from 2006 sales”, Computing SA citing Gartner. And if you’re wondering what is the major customer benefit iPhones brings (4M units sold in 2 quarters), here is my take: real and easy web browsing. I can at least speak for myself, I do not fire up my PC at home to navigate on the web and checkout my facebook page, I use my iPhone.
Claim#3: Web 2.0 is driving the webtop metaphor vs the desktop metaphor (check my post “from desktop to webtop” about it)

Now with the additional figure about e-commerce: “eMarketer predicts that online retailers in the US will ring up over $100 billion more in sales in 2012 than they did in 2007. Sales growth will come mainly from consumers who are shifting their spending from traditional retail stores to the Internet.”, eMarketer. Take a look at the table for more details, but you can easily figure out that buying behavior and for that matter marketing web behavior are shifting big time. I would strongly advise to revise your marketing mix to accommodate at least 20-25% to web marketing including viral marketing techniques.

Finally, and I’m sure we’ll agree easily, web content has also shifted to video and pictures. For this one, I’ll let you find the figures. Let’s rock marketing on the web for 2008 fellow marketeers.

Web 2.0 goes mobile: 2.7 Billion phones out there



As I was looking for some numbers to support my yesterday’s post, I found this very interesting one Communities Dominate Brands: Putting 2.7 billion in context: Mobile phone users, from authors of this Communities Dominate Brands book I didn’t read yet, providing interesting metrics to think about:
800 million cars, 850 million personal computers, 1.3 B fixed land line phones, 1.4 billion credit cards, 1.5 billion TV sets. How many mobile phones in use today? In use today, yes, 2.7 billion. They sold 950 million phones last year and the total worldwide mobile subscriber base grew from 2.1 billion to 2.7 billion. Three times as many mobile phones as automobiles or personal computers. About twice as many mobile phone owners as those of fixed land line phones or credit cards. And almost twice as many mobile phones in use as TV sets.” —

Let’s draw a rapid conclusion here, mobile phones or more widely Mobile devices will have the next big impact on the web as carriers evolve their business model for Internet access to a flat monthly fee as for broadband. The next massive disruption on the net is already happening: Web 2.0 goes mobile. Consumers will voice their opinion, pictures and videos to share visual news taking place close to them directly from their phones!

Tell me fellow marketers, would you ignore this bidirectional medium when you know Marketing 2.0 is already here? What a big bet!

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Mobile Marketing: use it carefully, but use it



I was attending Ad Tech Paris yesterday, a good way to capture on-line advertising trends. Among other interesting sessions, I was appealed by the mobile advertising one called “Mobile advertising – the long and winding road” coordinated by the Mobile Entertainment Forum (MEF). Speakers, see picture from left to right, were Marc-Henri Magdelenat — Screentonic, Minh Tran — Nokia Mobile Advertising, Patrick Parodi — Amobee & MEF, Richard Saggers — Vodafone and our moderator Gilles Babinet — Eyeka.

They covered a lot of ground to explain how important was mobile advertising among our marketing tactics and how unique was its approach. Not to forget for instance that permission marketing in this space is mandatory, nothing is more personal than your phone, right? Mobile Phones are the only new device that people carry all the time since watches were introduced. Some do even sleep with these! Keep in mind as well that consumers are actually paying to receive adverts so we should keep ads short and relevant. And finally, coupons on mobile phones — yes, bar codes on your phone to present to the store you’re in or close to — are far easier to use for consumers than traditional ones or even web ones, especially when coupled with your location.

Having experienced the mobile industry at Sun Microsystems myself, when marketing the Java platform, I could not agree more to the effectiveness of mobile marketing. Europe and Asia are for sure ahead of the curve about it, as mobile devices connected to the Internet are spreading fast there. The UK even have a dedicated web-zine about it called Mobile Marketing Magazine. Amazing!

But I think some key aspects were eluded during the conference. Mobile phones do have key attributes that can nurture marketing ROI:

  • Authentication: we know who you are for sure,
  • Payment: your Telco provider can charge you for what you buy or consume with it, opening an opportunity for Telcos to become trusted party for e-commerce,
  • Impulse and web 2.0: as you carry your phone with you all the time, nothing would be more natural than to use it for an impulsive buying decision and to channel back your opinion to the brand right away.

Not to mention that within the next 3 to 5 years, mobile devices will become the primary Internet access for consumers, as Japan experienced already. The user experience will significantly improve as well, check the iPhone introduction by Steve jobs here in Marketing 2.0 to get a feel for it.

Marketing 2.0 minded marketers cannot ignore mobile marketing when planning for the next campaign. Consider it for sure in your mix, but very carefully as this could be a double edge sword.