Tag Archives: Web 2.0

Social Media Increases Small-Business Exposure


Interesting research by American Express OPEN highlighted by emarketer this week showing that SMB in the US actually consider Social Media activity increases their business exposure. The Social Media usage is making progress as well:

“While just one in 10 business owners reported using social networking for marketing last year, 39% indicated they did in September 2010” — eMarketer

Facebook seems to lead their with 27% using it, LinkedIn 9%, Twitter 8% and Blogging 5% are far behind. But resistance is still very present for SMBs, more than three in five reported not using social media at all, and the biggest reason they gave was that it did not apply to their industry.

We’ll get there.

Social Media Revolution Video


This is a refresh of this very good video that provides factual data to make all of us aware of how fast Social Media and Web 2.0 waves are progressing in our daily life. I use very often this eye opener video in my presentations.

The Thin Line Between Liking a Brand and Liking Its Social Marketing


Good article on Emarketer

While Facebook fans and Twitter followers are often out for deals, they also care about showing support for brands they love—but that might not be an invitation to be marketed to. What does a brand fan’s self-expression mean for the kinds of messages marketers should push out? Full Article


– Posted using BlogPress from my iPhone

The History of the Internet, Visualized


The History of the Internet, Visualized

Web evolution? Web 3.0 and Web 4.0 predictions


I found this perspective on web evolution quite interesting. We know predictions are a dangerous sport, but thinking about this might inspire you.

Third generation ERP: user-centric and social


ERP Evolution

Back in the 80’s, ERP software have been created in order to address a key productivity issue in the enterprise. The goal, as it is still the case today, was to reduce transaction costs in automating key business processes from manufacturing through finance and sales organizations.

Transaction Cost

The notion of transaction cost was introduced back in the 30’s by a brilliant British economist by the name of Ronald Coase in his essay The Nature of the Firm in 1937 to explain why the economy is populated by a number of business firms, instead of consisting exclusively of a multitude of independent, self-employed people who contract with one another. It is an even more interesting approach knowing that this research occurred just after the big depression period, to be remembered as we have been going through an impressive downturn just now.

A transaction cost can be defined as a cost incurred in making an economic exchange. For example, most people, when buying or selling a stock, must pay a commission to their broker; that commission is a transaction cost of doing the stock deal.

Or consider the evolution of transacting with your bank. Back a few decades ago, you would have to go to the branch office for any operations like deposit a check, getting cash… This induced for the bank to maintain branch offices and full-time employees managing these interactions. The cost of every transaction with its customers was in the $10 range average. Over time, the banking industry leveraged telephone based interactions, ATMs and of course internet banking to take that transaction cost significantly down, let’s say a few cents. At the same time, customer satisfaction went up as the transaction can take place at any time 24/7, from anywhere and customers are driving the transaction themselves.

ERP Evolution of the 90’s

As the success of ERPs went on and businesses understood the value of automating key business processes with “off-the-shelf” enterprise application software instead of writing one from scratch, their appetite for more automation, more users involved and lower transaction costs, increased.

The advent of the web and its ability to connect totally different IT systems seamlessly over the cloud, with e-mail to start with then web services, offered an opportunity to ERP vendors to expand the ERP scope to other part of the organization such as sales force automation (CRM), supply chain operations (SCM, SRM) and product life cycle management (PLM). It also did pave the way to connect remote users to the ERP via thin clients or ERP client in a browser to be more precise.

This was the second generation ERP, in which a lot of ERP vendors are still in, allowing for users of the extended enterprise (suppliers, resellers, customers…) to participate in key business processes thus lowering even further transaction costs.

3rd Generation ERP

As a result, all of the ERP vendors did a pretty good job to automate all transactional business processes such as order-to-cash, service fulfillment and supply chain execution.

As a matter of fact, employees are now focusing on managing exceptions and pursuing business opportunities which are highly collaborative or information driven activities, devoting minimal time to transactional business processes. This is good for the enterprise and ERPs are thriving on this.

The net result is that the appetite to lower transaction costs is increasing again but this time, to automate more business processes, ERPs must take into account:

Digital natives are to rule the business

Digital Natives or Generation Y, referring to individuals born between the mid 70’s and early 90’s, will outnumber baby boomers in the enterprise in 2010.

96% of them already joined a social network online and they will be the managers of our businesses within the next 10 years. They are all about these new technologies to conduct both their personal life as well as their professional one, which reinforces the need to accommodate them when we think about ERPs and more generally the new generation of enterprise applications.

User centric ERP

As we combine the appetite to lower transaction cost, encompassing collaborative business processes, as well as re-engage with all users of the extended enterprise and accept that individuals are more educated and better equipped at home than in the office when it gets down to information technologies, ERPs need to reinvent itself one more time.

ERPs must be thought from the user out, it must be user-centric and re-engage with all stakeholders in the enterprise or it will become legacy. Modernizing ERPs towards 3rd generation ERPs, as described earlier, is a must to reach new levels of productivity, agility and effectiveness in the extended enterprise.

The recent evolution of our globalized and highly competitive economy, the acceleration of change and the ubiquity of information will allow for no choice but for enterprises to embrace these new trends or disappear.

“Between the dawn of civilization and 2003 there were 5 exabytes of information created, same as in the last 2 days.” — Eric Schmid, Google CEO

Now is a good time to replace legacy business management software, as most companies did that move back 7 to 10 years ago with Y2K, the Euro introduction or US GAAP, IFRS or Sarbane Oxley regulations.

Emerging economies should take advantage of their relative low technology adoption to leap frog this information era revolution and appear as highly competitive businesses. The wired economy we’re living in now is a massive opportunity.

How Social Computing enters the enterprise?


As I’ve embarked in an interesting journey about creating a social networking set of tools and community site for my company, I tend to look more closely on how others did it and the dos and don’t on the topic.

Here is an interesting quick summary of the considered two ways social computing are adopted in the enterprise, according to Dion Hinchcliffe: Top-down and bottom-up. No rocket science here, but it’s interesting to see first that both ways are recommended and not exclusive as well as what drives and supports each way.

Here is an “encouraging” note to those of you in a hurry 😉 from Social Computing Journal :

“Based on their findings, the Nielsen Norman Group estimates a timeline of approximately three to five years for most organizations to successfully adopt and integrate social technologies into their intranets. They also suggest that the political and cultural changes needed for its useful and widespread use may take longer”

Have fun! I’ll keep you posted on how it goes for us.

Social Networking Users Demand for a Single Place for their Digital Identity


Good Material to support our Marketing Plans. This Universal McCann research is conducted every year and this is the 4th Wave. Social Media is taking the web planet by storm but now is the time where it seems active internet users – those accessing at least every other day – are looking for the “one place” for their digital identity rather than spreading around various specialized social sites.

Just a few numbers to give you a clue:

  1. 62.5% of active internet users (16-54 years old) have created a social profile in 2009,
  2. 71,1% have visited a friend’s home page.
  3. 81.5% of Social Networking Users did message friends,
  4. 76.3% uploaded photos,
  5. 74.3% found old friends
  6. 56.4% found new friends
  7. 47.9% joined a group

We should provide these influencing people ways to populate their unique digital profile with ways to engage and maintain dialog with our brands in different form factors. Video is still the #1 form factor, but “instant UGM news” is ramping up as twitter‘s success attests and Facebook acquiring FriendFeed – that I started to use recently – reinforces as well.

Enterprise 2.0 is coming: 30% of executives see social networking belonging to their business strategy


A recent research from Deloitte – see chart – gives us a clear signal that Enterprise 2.0 is making progress in our 2009 corporate world. As expected, this social transformation is coming from the people getting self-organized rather than from the top, as anticipated in the very good book Here Comes Everybody: The Power of Organizing Without Organizations.

As a matter of fact, 55% executives reveal that their company do not have an official policy for social networks. They’d better have one because it’s easy to damage a company’s reputation on social media as nearly 75% employees agrees.

There is also a risk for employees to expose their profile on social media as it can impact their reputation in their job context in a negative way. We need to address these privacy issues over time, but for now just beware to separate what your “friends” see from what the world can see.

B2B Marketers’ Priorities and Pain Points for 2009



According to Marketing Sherpa new research, the previous one was conducted in Feb 2008, B2B marketers will focus on:

  1. Dealing with lengthening sales cycles
  2. Doing more with less
  3. Web 2.0 and social media marketing
  4. Focusing on lower-cost, high-impact lead gen tactics

I will obviously only highlight the point 2. which wouldn’t have been on the list a few month ago. I remember being looked at as a strange animal when pitching about Marketing 2.0 back in 2007. I heard many things as “this is just a fad”, “you’re always trying to bring up something new”, “Our customers are not 15 years old”, etc.

In the marketing area, social media and Web 2.0 importance is raising under this economic downturn period we’re in, more rapidly I anticipate than if the business was going to grow. I’m expecting Cloud Computing and new software subscription business models to come up more rapidly in the IT space for the exact same reason. The economic downturn is an incredible opportunity to reconsider what we’ve been doing so far, to challenge deeply our fundamentals, to stress decisions that were not that urgent otherwise. A good thing in my views though of course I suffer just as everyone out there of this downturn (mood downturn as well by the way).

The research points out that many marketers still find Web 2.0 usage within their marketing campaigns arsenal a challenge. First and foremost because Web 2.0 is still new for a lot of them. They’re not digital natives and tend to relate to the activities they’re comfortable with (Webinars, White papers, etc.). Their top challenges, according to the research are:

  1. Social media development/integration
  2. Developing emerging Web 2.0 content, such as videos, blogs and podcasts

My take would be for you, already a blog reader ;-), to start your day in the office tomorrow by deciding to integrate in one of your planned campaigns a Marketing 2.0 technique. Try to pick the one that is intuitively the most relevant to your audience (start a blog or a podcast, foster a community or integrate an existing one, turn a major topic of interest into a wiki for and by your customers, start a twitter micro-blog for one of your offer) and do not forget about including video material as we discussed earlier this month.

I would also support this recommendation from Marketing Sherpa:

“Mapping content to the sales funnel “ is an immensely important aspect of success in lead nurturing for the complex sale. It deserves to be among the top priorities because some of the others – Web 2.0, social media and traditional content – are at their most effective when mapped to the sales cycle.

Marketing 2.0 will make it big in 2009.