Tag Archives: Google

What a pivotal year in our industry! Mobile, Cloud and Social making new leaders


What a pivotal year in our industry! Let’s face it, IT has been attesting more evidences that its tectonic forces at work did let emerge new leaders and previous ones fade.

Combining this to Big Data and associated analytics to get a modern business insight, let’s attest we’re already in a new world. Get ready if you’re not already! CIO, CMO, CDO or CEOs, don’t let your competition harness these revolutions before you get a chance to compete or lead: initiate change now.

Mobile computing is taking IT by storm: mobile world congress – iPad 3 announcement – Ray Ozzie interview


Without surprise it was the mobility week recently. With Mobile World 2012 just closing, this has been a week of announcements and research publications. As eWeek tries to summarize it, here are 10 hot mobile Trends to watch at Mobile World Congress 2011:

  1. Bigger is better: it seems larger display are more desirable this year
  2. Android Galore: without Apple around, Android was everywhere leaving Windows on the side for next year
  3. Microsoft needs Nokia—desperately
  4. Dual- and quad-core processors are everything
  5. Fresh new designs aren’t needed? No revolutionary designs introduced.
  6. The “converged” device matters: smartphone bridging the gap with tablets
  7. There’s no changing carriers: disappointed if you wanted to hear some breaking news from Carriers though customer relations are in pain.
  8. Companies think there’s room for other operating systems: Mozilla announced its own mobile OS, Samsung did the same with Bada, running after Android and iOS.
  9. iPad 3 fear reigns supreme: anticipated announcement on March 7, even Google had to admit via Andy Rubin that they’re behind iOS.
  10. The enterprise is an afterthought: Mobile World Congress is all about consumers. To be analyzed with CIO client strategy in the enterprise.
$GOOG Google Play replaces #Android Market, new source for apps, books, movies and music (funny video 1’30)engt.co/zYiIaf
The New Era of Computing bit.ly/xjxIfO

The announcement of the iPad HD, capturing all the buzz, is showing once again how much Apple is running the show. It looks like the entire industry is positioning itself regarding Apple and the impact of “The Barber Of Infinite Loop” on once the center of all attention Microsoft could be serious. Thus I encourage you to take a look at this Ray Ozzie interview video, the once Bill Gates visionary successor at Microsoft, who is starting a new venture and tells it very directly PC doesn’t mean desktop PC anymore but Personal Computing in a variety of form factor. What a thrilling industry!

Apple’s new iPad announcement: The numbers to know | ZDNet zd.net/ACGsNH
Video Q&A: Ray Ozzie, Bill Gates successor as $MSFT visionary on startups, Microsoft, … states world is over the PC bit.ly/y4WY1s
The Barber Of Infinite Loop: How The #iPad Could Give Microsoft A Serious Revenue Haircut – $MSFT productivity apps tcrn.ch/wrrKC7

    Week in review: Big Data’s impact on the world – Enterprise Apps gold rush to the cloud


    Big Data is pursuing to bubble up as the topic of choice for the beginning of 2012, even during Davos. Not surprising when one can attest that the cloud computing model is making significant progress all over the planet and even in my home country, France, where skepticism used to be the attitude regarding it. In turn, leveraging the cloud leads to Big Data, in a business context as well, to try to extract from all sorts of data streams meaningful business insights.

    Big Data’s Impact in the World
    Steve Lohr, in the New York Times, develops some examples in various areas and highlights some interesting numbers.

    I won’t come back on Facebook IPO as the entire planet just twitted and blogged about it. But let’s step back 5 years ago and remember how people where viewing Facebook back then. It changed big time, Facebook is no longer a youngster phenomena but a business eye opener. Amazing 180° view of the world for a company supposedly going to be valued more than $100B now. Don’t you think? We’re already in a new world. Social Media is now a reality to most businesses, Marketing cannot ignore it anymore and mobile devices are becoming rapidly the #1 entry point to it. By the way, what is the revenue Facebook is making on mobiles ;-)? (None for now, but stay tuned).

    By the way, recently SAP acquired Successfactors for $3.4B, Salesforce.com did the same with Rypple and Oracle with Taleo for $1.9B and RightNow, check this out. The enterprise apps gold rush seems to be on the cloud.

    As Larry Ellison said about cloud computing in 2008: “What is it? It’s complete gibberish. It’s insane. When is this idiocy going to stop?” Not there yet apparently 😉

    So are you ready for Big Data, cloud computing, social networks and mobile internet?

    We’re moving from Desktop to Webtop



    “Microsoft and IBM executives Wednesday admitted feeling heat from Google now that the Web search giant is trying to make inroads into the enterprise market with its hosted suite of communication and collaboration tools.” says NetworkWorld.

    Desktop productivity suites — i.e. Microsoft and Open Office — are beginning to appear as legacy apps for younger internet user generation. If you think about it, up to a few years ago, our desktop was application centric. You’d have to think about what application to use to either create, edit or read information. In this antic time, still valid for conservative users, Office was the place where we’d live on our desktop. Not anymore for Internet centric users, especially 15-24 years old.

    Multimedia content, supported with the advent and success of Youtube, flickr, slide.com, and others not to forget podcasts, is paving the way to another information form factor. As a matter of fact, information streams to you via RSS feeds sitting on your desktop via Netvibes personal portal on the web and various widgets. Google apps are starting to give a clear headway towards SaaS collaborative “desktop” productivity applications, not to mention they’ve just completed another step in completeness with Tonic acquisition — a presentation sharing and collaboration solution for Powerpoint slides.

    To sum it up, I believe we’ve moved from Desktop to Webtop with several key implication:

    • Our digital environment is no more sitting on our PC but on the network,
    • Our environment is no longer application centric but user centric i.e. information is flowing your way whatever the application required to exploit it should be. Various alerts are pacing your information day from blogs, information sites, our mailbox and calendar,
    • Users are empowered to design their environment, not software vendors!

    Webtop is a personalized web hosted desktop that you can use everywhere, from any device, that no software vendor would design for you. This is pure Web 2.0 attitude: users are designing their webtop “app” aggregating various components in an iterative and collaborative way — users recommend widgets and apps to others. Gone the day when software vendors were dictating their view of the world. Folks, we’re in charge again. And webtop already have vendors, check out Goowy.

    Microsoft colleagues, can you feel the heat?

    Google Gears: last mile to a 100% web based application world?


    In a meeting recently, in my new job at Sage, we were discussing with R&D about the client model in our new world. Interesting debate among specialists that are seeing the world through RIA (Rich Internet Application), RDA (Rich Desktop Application) and the fading 100% HTML or client/server models. It clearly shows we’ve been moving fast in a connected world were web based applications are weaving into desktop based applications.

    Tectonic moves are taking place between Microsoft, with the Silverlight new cross-platform and cross-browser Internet platform, Adobe’s Apollo run-time and the newly announced Google Gears Javascript API to let web applications work off-line. Read Information Week Why Google Gears Is Good News, Bad News For Microsoft article for a better understanding of the landscape and browse through the 92 news articles about it.

    But now the non connected world enters web based applications and the very last argument pleading for desktop based applications is just going away, even before being connected to the Internet will be as natural as receiving daylight (a bit futuristic I must admit, but you know me by now I like to provoke). Give it a try and install it. Are you as curious as I am to see what the next Google/Microsoft battle is going to be?

    One thing for sure: user’s information environment is already partly on the web and on his desktop. I’m not a big fan of this as users need to decide before searching or operating where the information might be or be sure they carry a laptop with them at all times. My bet is user’s information are going to move 100% on the web with a solid secure access and backup. The device we will be using to access and manipulate this data is secondary and might just be borrowed when we need it.

    Microsoft finally strikes back


    Even on holidays, I could not escape the news: Microsoft finally made its mind on how to enter the $125 billion Advertising Market, they acquired aQuantive on May 18th for $6 billion.

    Interestingly enough, not only do they acquire one of the most powerful web media buyer but they also acquire web design services through its Avenue A/Razorfish division.

    One thing is sure, as I was wondering after Google’s DoubleClick acquisition in Would you have Google as your middleman”, Microsoft had an answer to the Internet titan move. Sad news for web ad agencies, competition and battleground have changed in your world within a few weeks (see chart). Read this Microsoft Storms Madison Avenue article in AdvertisingAge for more on the earthquake.

    But folks, let me enjoy my vacation fully, I’ll be back in June.

    Would you have Google as your middle man?



    First of all thanks to those of you asking me to write more often, much appreciated. One of the reason I didn’t write too much recently lies in the fact that I started to work in a new company and I’m overwhelmed with new information to absorb and categorize. I wish I had a Wiki built in my brain, so everyone could contribute. But that would be brain 2.0 isn’t it?

    So fellow marketers, I’ll be getting back to a better post frequency as soon as possible and of course I’ll let you know rapidly what company decided to have me on board. The one thing I can tell you at this point is that I’m back to the Enterprise Application Software gang. It’s going to rock there and I’ll be writing about it in the near future.

    I just wanted to drive your attention to this interesting joint Intel and Google announcement I read in Advertising Age: Intel, Google Join Forces for ‘Virtual Marketing Storefront’. Let’s get rid of the bells and whistles, Intel is agreeing to have Google as the middle man to manage partners co-marketing on-line (at least for on-line advertising for now). Strange move isn’t it, and I don’t buy it. If one vendor is serious about his ecosystem, one needs to manage it and not leave this to third parties having a biased interest that might hurt the vendor’s strategy.
    I don’t have anything against Google, and I should say I praise them to have vigorously made Web 2.0 strong, but I would not let Google be my middle-man, instead I’d have Google be my ecosystem provider. Not to mention that Intel’s partners would probably benefit from an integrated approach to their co-marketing experience with Intel. On-line advertising is far from being enough.

    Apart from this, if you didn’t notice Google’s accelerated pace to expand their business footprint, here is a quote that says it all:

    “This month alone, the company has announced its intent to acquire ad-placement giant DoubleClick; struck a deal with Clear Channel Radio to sell ads on its radio stations; added support from several major radio-station systems for its Google AdSense for Audio program; and partnered with EchoStar to sell TV commercials over the satellite broadcaster’s Dish Network. ” — Beth Snyder Bulik, Advertising Age

    Hey fellows at Microsoft, it’s about time for you to react to try to grab some of the $125 billion advertising market Steve Ballmer claimed he was after.