Tag Archives: Viral Marketing

Social Marketing: identify influencers for free


source Elliott Lemenager 

This is the question I get very often even from marketers already involved and active in Social Marketing: how to identify influencers? Yes, seems like 101 but actually not so easy to figure it out.

The notion of influencers came first to me with Regis McKenna back in the 80’s — wow already! Here is the quote:

« The infrastructure includes all individuals between a vendor and its customers that can influence the buying process. » — Regis McKenna

Pretty wide isn’t it? But for B2B marketers like me this is so true and so daunting. Today’s Marketing 2.0 reinforces and stresses our imperative to identify them and reach out to them through social media because we need them to be involved in the conversation, hopefully positively.

To start with today, I wanted to share with you this blog post: Social Marketing: Hybrid Approach to Identifying Targeted Influencers. Dive in as Elliott’s post has lots of tips and links to tools and present it in a very simple way. His Hybrid approach actually refers to a combination of manual operations and free services you can use if you’re on a budget contraint and cannot hire an agency to help you. Enjoy!

source Elliott Lemenager 

Social media marketing: build a lasting methodology


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Here is an interesting post about optimizing your social media marketing from David Kirkpatrick, Marketing Experiment.

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p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 10.0px 0.0px; line-height: 17.0px; font: 12.0px Verdana; color: #555555} Justin Bridegan, Marketing Manager MECLABS Primary Research said, “One of the most difficult parts of social media marketing is creating a lasting methodology that works.  Time and resources continue to be two of the most difficult challenges social marketers face.”
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Justin’s key takeaways:
  1. Start small and test – “You don’t know what you don’t know”
  2. Having a solid social marketing methodology in place will allow you to focus on real obtainable goals.
  3. Determine the most effective offers for your campaigns including: Contests, incentives and promotions
  4. Weigh Quality vs. Quantity with your offers, and remember the need for balance in your engagement
  5. Successful campaigns don’t always equate to revenue, but can be one of many contributing components

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Related resources on Marketing Sherpa

    The Thin Line Between Liking a Brand and Liking Its Social Marketing


    Good article on Emarketer

    While Facebook fans and Twitter followers are often out for deals, they also care about showing support for brands they love—but that might not be an invitation to be marketed to. What does a brand fan’s self-expression mean for the kinds of messages marketers should push out? Full Article


    – Posted using BlogPress from my iPhone

    Third generation ERP: user-centric and social


    ERP Evolution

    Back in the 80’s, ERP software have been created in order to address a key productivity issue in the enterprise. The goal, as it is still the case today, was to reduce transaction costs in automating key business processes from manufacturing through finance and sales organizations.

    Transaction Cost

    The notion of transaction cost was introduced back in the 30’s by a brilliant British economist by the name of Ronald Coase in his essay The Nature of the Firm in 1937 to explain why the economy is populated by a number of business firms, instead of consisting exclusively of a multitude of independent, self-employed people who contract with one another. It is an even more interesting approach knowing that this research occurred just after the big depression period, to be remembered as we have been going through an impressive downturn just now.

    A transaction cost can be defined as a cost incurred in making an economic exchange. For example, most people, when buying or selling a stock, must pay a commission to their broker; that commission is a transaction cost of doing the stock deal.

    Or consider the evolution of transacting with your bank. Back a few decades ago, you would have to go to the branch office for any operations like deposit a check, getting cash… This induced for the bank to maintain branch offices and full-time employees managing these interactions. The cost of every transaction with its customers was in the $10 range average. Over time, the banking industry leveraged telephone based interactions, ATMs and of course internet banking to take that transaction cost significantly down, let’s say a few cents. At the same time, customer satisfaction went up as the transaction can take place at any time 24/7, from anywhere and customers are driving the transaction themselves.

    ERP Evolution of the 90’s

    As the success of ERPs went on and businesses understood the value of automating key business processes with “off-the-shelf” enterprise application software instead of writing one from scratch, their appetite for more automation, more users involved and lower transaction costs, increased.

    The advent of the web and its ability to connect totally different IT systems seamlessly over the cloud, with e-mail to start with then web services, offered an opportunity to ERP vendors to expand the ERP scope to other part of the organization such as sales force automation (CRM), supply chain operations (SCM, SRM) and product life cycle management (PLM). It also did pave the way to connect remote users to the ERP via thin clients or ERP client in a browser to be more precise.

    This was the second generation ERP, in which a lot of ERP vendors are still in, allowing for users of the extended enterprise (suppliers, resellers, customers…) to participate in key business processes thus lowering even further transaction costs.

    3rd Generation ERP

    As a result, all of the ERP vendors did a pretty good job to automate all transactional business processes such as order-to-cash, service fulfillment and supply chain execution.

    As a matter of fact, employees are now focusing on managing exceptions and pursuing business opportunities which are highly collaborative or information driven activities, devoting minimal time to transactional business processes. This is good for the enterprise and ERPs are thriving on this.

    The net result is that the appetite to lower transaction costs is increasing again but this time, to automate more business processes, ERPs must take into account:

    Digital natives are to rule the business

    Digital Natives or Generation Y, referring to individuals born between the mid 70’s and early 90’s, will outnumber baby boomers in the enterprise in 2010.

    96% of them already joined a social network online and they will be the managers of our businesses within the next 10 years. They are all about these new technologies to conduct both their personal life as well as their professional one, which reinforces the need to accommodate them when we think about ERPs and more generally the new generation of enterprise applications.

    User centric ERP

    As we combine the appetite to lower transaction cost, encompassing collaborative business processes, as well as re-engage with all users of the extended enterprise and accept that individuals are more educated and better equipped at home than in the office when it gets down to information technologies, ERPs need to reinvent itself one more time.

    ERPs must be thought from the user out, it must be user-centric and re-engage with all stakeholders in the enterprise or it will become legacy. Modernizing ERPs towards 3rd generation ERPs, as described earlier, is a must to reach new levels of productivity, agility and effectiveness in the extended enterprise.

    The recent evolution of our globalized and highly competitive economy, the acceleration of change and the ubiquity of information will allow for no choice but for enterprises to embrace these new trends or disappear.

    “Between the dawn of civilization and 2003 there were 5 exabytes of information created, same as in the last 2 days.” — Eric Schmid, Google CEO

    Now is a good time to replace legacy business management software, as most companies did that move back 7 to 10 years ago with Y2K, the Euro introduction or US GAAP, IFRS or Sarbane Oxley regulations.

    Emerging economies should take advantage of their relative low technology adoption to leap frog this information era revolution and appear as highly competitive businesses. The wired economy we’re living in now is a massive opportunity.

    Social Networking Users Demand for a Single Place for their Digital Identity


    Good Material to support our Marketing Plans. This Universal McCann research is conducted every year and this is the 4th Wave. Social Media is taking the web planet by storm but now is the time where it seems active internet users – those accessing at least every other day – are looking for the “one place” for their digital identity rather than spreading around various specialized social sites.

    Just a few numbers to give you a clue:

    1. 62.5% of active internet users (16-54 years old) have created a social profile in 2009,
    2. 71,1% have visited a friend’s home page.
    3. 81.5% of Social Networking Users did message friends,
    4. 76.3% uploaded photos,
    5. 74.3% found old friends
    6. 56.4% found new friends
    7. 47.9% joined a group

    We should provide these influencing people ways to populate their unique digital profile with ways to engage and maintain dialog with our brands in different form factors. Video is still the #1 form factor, but “instant UGM news” is ramping up as twitter‘s success attests and Facebook acquiring FriendFeed – that I started to use recently – reinforces as well.

    Do you see the elephant?




    http://cl1.clipster.ws/sf/flashcount.php?a=lp&cpath=DSG20080070070&cfile=elephant01_00&cid=4&pid=0


    You know I usually never discuss matters directly relating to the company I work for, but today I need to make an exception.
    I was fortunate enough to participate to the public launch of Sage ERP X3 in Germany. Kudos to the team! Big milestone in our expansion, well prepared, executed with fun.
    So here is why the exception: the German team decided to produce a funny video and I could not help but to share it with you.

    Have fun! Share it, ERP marketing can be fun as well 😉

    I’m sure Christopher on the team would be happy to discuss about typical marketing 2.0 tactics.

    WOMM: Marketing 2.0 lethal weapon



    One of the most critical dimension of Marketing 2.0 lies in Word of Mouth Marketing (WOMM). As defined in wikipedia:

    “it is a term used in the marketing and advertising industry to describe activities that companies undertake to generate personal recommendations as well as referrals for brand names, products and services.”

    WOMM in my opinion was first identified by Regis McKenna when describing the market infrastructure in his aging book The Regis Touch. WOMM now has its association Word of Mouth Marketing Association and his guru Word Of Mouth Marketing: How Smart Companies Get People Talking – Andy Sernovitz. As Andy puts it, here is his WOMM Manifesto:

    “1. Happy customers are your best advertising. Make people happy.
    2. Marketing is easy: Earn the respect and recommendation of your
    customers. They will do your marketing for you, for free.
    3. Ethics and good service come first.
    4. UR the UE: You are the user experience (not what your ads say you are).
    5. Negative word of mouth is an opportunity. Listen and learn.
    6. People are already talking. Your only option is to join the conversation.
    7. Be interesting or be invisible.
    8. If it’s not worth talking about, it’s not worth doing.
    9. Make the story of your company a good one.
    10. It is more fun to work at a company that people want to talk about.
    11. Use the power of word of mouth to make business treat people better.
    12. Honest marketing makes more money.” — Andy Sernovitz

    Let’s make sure you’ve got a WOMM plan embedded in your coming PR activities. It is cheap, mostly effective, but terribly difficult to ramp up. Who are the individuals you’re targeting? How do you approach them without sounding too much biased? How do you recognize them? With what stories and messages do you nurture them? All these questions need to be addressed prior initiating your WOMM as WOMM is Marketing 2.0 lethal weapon.

    – Image courtesy of The influencers at http://www.theinfluencers.ca